Advent Hymns Friday, Dec 2 2016 

I came across this version…quite possibly one of the truest out there.

Did Not Need That Thursday, Dec 1 2016 

The big chest freezer died. With it went a fair bit of meat, some nice pasta sauce, some squash, probably about a bushel of beans, several pints of applesauce, and a number of peaches, blueberries, cranberries, and apples. As well as some oddments, ranging from turkey stock to some birds being used for still life drawing (sorry Mom, but PONG was emanating from that package, and it was rather….soft).

I did save the fifty year old piece of wedding cake though!

But for the most part, Mush, or almost mush, or simply not enough space in the regular freezer.

That will teach me to take up canning.

That d—- thing was only about four years old too. I bet the warranty was three and a half.

From the Archives two Wednesday, Nov 30 2016 

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Continuing to look back through the archives, I do like the humor in the old guestbooks.  In case you are wondering, that date is July 27…1876. Not 1976.

Enigmatic Essays Tuesday, Nov 29 2016 

Densely packed, no matter whether one agrees or not, and for once most of the comments are both sane and clean. It has been around awhile.

http://americandigest.org/mt-archives/truth_slant/on_advent_we_ar_1.php

 

From the archives Monday, Nov 28 2016 

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Some five years ago, the great 2011 snowstorm. It certainly makes for a spectacular image though!

Advent already!?

Deers and bears Saturday, Nov 26 2016 

Definitely something odd going on out there. In areas that used to have lots of deer, there are no deer or few deer. There are plenty of bears in those areas though, so it leads one to wonder if the bear population really is impacting the deer population. It is the only variable that has changed recently. One wonders where this experiment will end up. There should be a natural balance, but it may be that the bears have the upper hand, being highly adaptable. Or maybe, the natural level of the deer population really should be a lot lower than it has been. Or maybe both populations are artificially high. Science in action, or something.

For Thanksgiving Wednesday, Nov 23 2016 

Proclamation issued by Gov. Wilbur Cross on Nov. 12, 1936.
Time out of mind at this turn of the seasons when the hardy oak leaves rustle in the wind and the frost gives a tang to the air and the dusk falls early and the friendly evenings lengthen under the heel of Orion, it has seemed good to our people to join together in praising the Creator and Preserver, who has brought us by a way that we did not know to the end of another year. In observance of this custom, I appoint Thursday, the twenty-sixth of November, as a day of Public Thanksgiving for the blessings that have been our common lot and have placed our beloved State with the favored regions of earth – for all the creature comforts: the yield of the soil that has fed us and the richer yield from labor of every kind that has sustained our lives – and for all those things, as dear as breath to the body, that quicken man’s faith in his manhood, that nourish and strengthen his spirit to do the great work still before him: for the brotherly word and act; for honor held above price; for steadfast courage and zeal in the long, long search after truth; for liberty and for justice freely granted by each to his fellow and so as freely enjoyed; and for the crowning glory and mercy of peace upon our land; – that we may humbly take heart of these blessings as we gather once again with solemn and festive rites to keep our Harvest Home.
Given under my hand and seal of the State at the Capitol, in Hartford, this twelfth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and thirty six and of the independence of the United State [sic] the one hundred and sixty-first.
Wilbur L. Cross

November Monday, Nov 21 2016 

A nice day for a walk! or not. Actually, work. Now why we managed after months of sun to finally get back out in the field….on a Sunday, in the late afternoon, in a rain/snowstorm, to wallow in the mud?  Well, because that’s just the way the project runs! It made for a pretty drive home though, in the dark, once one climbed out of the valley the snow was collecting quite handsomely in the trees. (and the truck was warm)

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Timing Saturday, Nov 19 2016 

I guess, after several years, I have to accept that they really are not Christmas Cactus and not even really Thanksgiving Cactus. As always, blooming in early November:

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The big old one, which I think is a different hybrid, does bloom later. But the ones that are gold, orange, or light white/pink definitely prefer the earlier days when the light is shortening rather than lengthening.  Rather spectacular plants. And forgiving, the big orange doesn’t seem to mind that I dropped it on its head the other day, it being rather out of balance in its pot. I do like them. Someday I am going to get a genuine white one.  The only real challenge is that their growth habit makes them a bit ungainly (hence the dropping on the head).

Rain! Thursday, Nov 17 2016 

Finally, not much (about three quarters of an inch) but a little bit. It is always remarkable how that changes the fall leaves. They go from being crunchy, almost sharp feeling, and Loud, to a soft, quiet blanket in the forest.

It’s been an odd fall. We’ve had some cold night, enough to kill off things like marigolds, but nothing that has lasted. Consequently, I still have beets out in the garden. I could have chard too, but we pretty much ate our way through it; which is a good thing! For once it was us and not the deer. Not sure exactly where the deer are.  There is plenty of evidence in the woods for deer having been there, but they seem a bit more elusive this year, I’ve only seen a few at the bottom of the meadow. And one or two passing through the house lot.  It may be that the idea that the soaring bear population is crashing the deer population is being answered with a resounding ‘yes’.  Since both the bears and the deer are actually highest in number in suburbia, this could be a very complex interaction indeed. It will keep the wildlife biologists busy!

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